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Molecules of death

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Published by Imperial College Press in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Toxicology,
  • Poisons

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementeditors, R.H. Waring, G.B. Steventon, S.C. Mitchell.
ContributionsWaring, R. H., Steventon, G. B., Mitchell, Steve
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRA1211 .M65 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiv, 430 p. :
Number of Pages430
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18406760M
ISBN 101860948146, 1860948154
ISBN 109781860948145, 9781860948152
LC Control Number2008353749

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Molecules of Death - Rosemary H. Waring, Glyn B. Steventon, Steve C. Mitchell - Google Books This book has been developed over many years from several popular courses taught to students at both. Molecules of Death () This book has been developed over many years from several popular courses taught to students at both Birmingham and London universities. It provides an important step in introducing principles and concepts within the field of toxicology. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.   This book is based on a popular elective course taught to first year students at the University of Birmingham. It introduces the principles underlying toxicity and illustrates them by examples of poisons from gases, minerals, plants, fungi, bacteria and marine creatures. Each section is self.

The book ends with the most famous poisoning case in recent years, that of Alexander Litvinenko and his death from polonium chloride. The first half of each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its history, its chemistry, its use in medicine, its toxicology.   Each chapter is self-sufficient, enabling readers to dip into chapters of interest at random without any lack of understanding. The book is informative, with numerous clinical details, and will appeal to those who wish to delve into this fascinating subject. Sample Chapter(s) Introduction ( KB) Chapter 1: Aflatoxin (J C Ritchie). About this book. Molecules of Murder is about infamous murderers and famous victims; about people like Harold Shipman, Alexander Litvinenko, Adelaide Bartlett, and Georgi Markov. Few books on poisons analyse these crimes from the viewpoint of the poison itself, doing so throws a new light on how the murders or attempted murders were carried out Cited by: 3. Chemistry of Death of the first book in the Dr. David Hunter series. Hunter is a forensic expert who left his job in London after a tragedy forced him to make a change to his life. He's currently working in the small Norfolk village of Manham as a General Practitioner/5.

Molecules of death. [R H Waring; G B Steventon; Steve Mitchell;] -- "This book has been developed over many years from several popular courses taught to students at .   The book ends with the most famous poisoning case in recent years, that of Alexander Litvinenko and his death from polonium chloride." "The first half of each chapter starts by looking at the target molecule itself, its discovery, its history, its chemistry, its use in medicine, its toxicology, and its effects on the human : Molecules of emotions. A book written by a scientist, which is (was) also a woman, and a superb human being, who walked a long road to be able to explain scientifically why she was the way she was, and how our emotions could predestine and predict our health and even our death/5. This book follows on from John Emsley's international bestseller, "Elements of Murder", this time taking the reader on a journey of discovery into the world of dangerous organic poisons. "Molecules of Murder" describes ten highly toxic molecules which are of particular interest due to /5(60).